The new year is approaching quickly, and it is important to begin reflecting on your 2019 and what you want to accomplish in the new year. 

Laura Winter, with Medium, offers some ways to help you reflect on the past year and set your goals for the new year that align with your values:

Reflect on Your Accomplishments

“Think back to all of the things you accomplished during the year, anything you appreciate, and some place where you made great strides. Can you improve on any of these items? Are there goals you can set to keep these accomplishments at the forefront?”

Reflect on Your Setbacks

“It’s important to remember that we can learn more from our mistakes than our successes, but that doesn’t make us a failure. Where are places that you maybe didn’t accomplish what you wanted? What changes can you make in those areas to better your chances for success?”

Reflect on Your Habits

“Think about the habits you adopted that you are thankful for. Maybe you stopped drinking or smoking. Maybe you picked up an exercise habit. Think about how you can keep these going into the new year, or even challenge yourself to go the next step.

Even think about the habits you developed that you aren’t quite proud of. Maybe you started staying up later and suffered in the morning. Maybe you picked up one too many streaming services and can’t seem to get away from the TV. See if there are adjustments you can make to your habits as the new year begins.”

Set a Focus

“Now that you’ve reflected, set your focus on the things that you believe will make the biggest change in your life. Have a clear definition of what this change will be and be laser-focused. Make it the center of your attention.

For example, I am going to spend 2020 focused on the overarching goal of writing. That means any tasks that interfere with my one goal will inevitably be put in the back of my queue. My priority is making writing happen, and aligning my life to support that goal.”

Set an Intention

“Now that you have something to focus on, do a deep dive into it. Plan out how you are going to make that change happen. Schedule it into your day. Declare your why, or the big reason you want that change to happen.

Think back to my writing goal, which I now set my intentions. That plan, broken apart, includes changing some behaviors (like hitting snooze or not carrying a notebook around) as well as setting intentions and schedules during my day specifically around writing. It also includes projects such as book writing and editing as well as blogging and marketing more. I’ve even created an editorial calendar (part of my starting 2020 resolutions now) to give me a head start once January 1 arrives.”

Set a Structure

“I touched briefly on this above, but create a structure for which your goal can flourish. That might mean scheduling it into your day, creating a routine around it, setting reminders, changing your environment, or joining a community of support. All of these things can create accountability, either to yourself or to others. While you can have rewards around your goal, hopefully your time and dedication will reap benefits for you as well.

Sometimes we can’t always rely on motivation to keep us going. There are going to be days where we want to do anything but our goal. Obviously, healthy breaks can help us come back refreshed and ready to attack our goals, but creating a routine or ritual around your goal can be huge toward progress.”

Reflect on Your Intentions

“Just one review at the end of the year is not enough. Build monthly or weekly reviews into your schedule. Determine what is working and what isn’t working and make the necessary adjustments. Regular check-ins can help you stick to your new goals and habits and help you succeed in the long run.”

Published in Coworking Blog

Recently, a City Lab article named Salt Lake City the third fastest growing population of the creative class. From 2005 to 2019, Salt Lake City has seen a 43.6% growth, just trailing behind San Jose and San Francisco (47.2% and 45.2%, respectively). 

Richard Florida, the author, discusses the concept of “the rise of the rest.” The concept is described as, “a result of both increasingly unaffordable housing in established hubs and the improvement of the economies in less-established hubs.” 

The dominate hubs, like San Francisco, are notorious for the presence of fast-growing tech companies and extremely unaffordable housing units. Less-established hubs, like Salt Lake City, offer more affordable housing units, cheaper labor, and the ability to attract college graduates. 

So – Florida wanted to visually analyze this ever-evolving growth onto maps. 

With the help of Todd Gabe, an economist at the University of Maine, they collected data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey (ACS).

“I decided to take a closer look at what is actually happening to the geography of talent. I zeroed on changes in the location of the creative class for a period immediately before, during, and post-recession. While most studies equate talent with the share of adults who hold college degrees, my creative class metric is based on occupation. About nine in 10 Americans with a college degree are members of the creative class, which is made up of up of knowledge workers in education, healthcare, law, arts, tech, science, and business. But, only six in 10 members of the creative class hold a college degree.”

Florida and Gabe compared the concentrations of creative class growth and shares at 2005 and 2017. 

In 2005, Salt Lake City had one of the smallest shares of the creative class (at 31.6%), compared to the largest share, Washington D.C. at 47.8%.

Although from 2005 to 2017, Salt Lake City is at the top of the list for the fastest growth in creative class shares, at 24.1%

Salt Lake City shows no signs of slowing down. If your business is looking for a new place to grow, come join an inspiring community of the creative class at Work Hive located in the heart of Salt Lake City!.

Published in Coworking Blog

When we talk about the qualities we want in people, empathy is a big one. If you can empathize with people, then you can do a good job. If you have no ability to empathize, then it’s difficult to give people feedback, and it’s difficult to help people improve. Everything becomes harder.” Says Stewart Butterfield, the founder of Slack.

In an interview with The New York Times, Butterfield discussed the importance of empathy in the workplace and how that can lead to the elimination of unnecessary meetings. 

One way that empathy manifests itself is courtesy. Respecting people’s time is important. Don’t let your colleagues down; if you say you’re going to do something, do it. A lot of the standard traits that you would look for in any kind of organization come down to courteousness. It’s not just about having a veneer of politeness, but actually trying to anticipate someone else’s needs and meeting them in advance.” Butterfield says. 

Being courteous and aware of your colleague’s workload or schedule can demonstrate respect and will contribute to a thriving workplace culture, in hopes that they will reciprocate it in the future. One way to show this is by eliminating extraneous routine meetings. 

We have all been in those meetings—the meetings that interrupt your (productive) workday that turn out to be seemingly unproductive.

At Slack, the company has been canceling most of their meetings they have found to be extraneous. Being deliberate and courteous with people’s time by eliminating excessive meetings improves workplace culture and productivity.

One of our values is that you should be looking out for each other. Everyone should try to make the lives of everyone else who works here a little bit simpler. So if you’re going to call a meeting, you’re responsible for it, and you have to be clear what you want out of it. Have a synopsis and present well.” Butterfield says. 

Published in Coworking Blog